Business Jet Traveler’s Toolbox

Essential reading for anyone just getting started in bizav.

August 14, 2014
Photo: Flexjet
Notable Fractional Programs
August 14, 2014
Ameco Beijing
Global deliveries of turbine business airplanes increased 7.2 percent in this year’s first quarter over the first quarter of 2013, according to the General Aviation Manufacturers Association. The jump in deliveries will most likely mean a boost to business at centers that perform aircraft completions and refurbishments and companies that provide interior components.
August 14, 2014
XOJet offers and Elite Access program which guarantees access to the company's all Wi-Fi-equpped fleet.
Jet card options
August 10, 2014
Because hull insurance is based on the aircraft's agreed-to or stated value, there's potential for over- or under-insuring, which can be perilous. (Illustration: John  Lewis)
Your aircraft represents a wonderful business tool but also one of your largest potential exposures to catastrophic loss—one that could wipe out what you have spent years building. The importance of properly insuring against such loss should be obvious. Here’s a look at the most critical coverage types and clauses.
August 5, 2014
Flaris LAR 01
New-jet programs come in two flavors: completely clean-sheet-of-paper designs and updates of existing models. This article deals strictly with the former. The category is well populated, but mostly with midsize and super-midsize jets—a reflection of continuing softness in the entry-level sector and the rarefication of the large-jet and bizliner field. Bombardier, Cessna and Embraer all have models under development in what can be called the greater middle market, the most attractive category for fractional programs and other fleet customers. The large-jet business is seeing some action, although less of it: new projects are under way at Bombardier and Dassault and the rumor mill is running full tilt regarding Gulfstream programs building on the larger-cabin cross-section introduced by the G650.
August 4, 2014
Happy Jet Illustration: John Lewis
When you’re buying a jet, months of work culminate the moment you sign the papers. You’re finished with research, analysis, due diligence and inspections. You’ve had the last of your consultations with brokers, attorneys, accountants, pilots and mechanics. The marathon has been run and now you can reap the rewards.
July 29, 2014
Teterboro, New Jersey-based charter company Meridian also offers FBO, aircraft management and maintenance services.
  Air Charter Service (aircharterservice.com, NY office: 516-432-5901) Worldwide charter broker has access to more than 50,000 aircraft.   Air Partner (airpartner.com, 888-247-7278)
July 22, 2014
Which of the major bizav access models—charter, jet card or fractional ownership—best suits you? To begin to answer that question, determine which of the statements below apply to you. If more than half of the statements for an access option apply, it could be a good choice. Note, though, that not all statements carry equal weight; the hours you fly annually can trump other factors in determining whether a solution is appropriate.
July 20, 2014
Given the complexity of the deal and the money at stake, making a business aircraft change hands can seem almost like an act of magic. And as in Disney’s The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, acts of this sort are best left to professionals—specifically, aircraft brokers and their teams.
July 7, 2014
A flight attendant welcomes VistaJet client Frank McCourt, chairman and CEO of McCourt Global, aboard a Bombardier Global 6000 (Photo: Mark Wagner)
Given the amount of money involved, picking the right way to employ business aviation is one of the most critical financial decisions you can face. Unless you’re buying a whole aircraft, the first choice you have to make is what access model would best suit your needs, be it a fractional share, a jet card or traditional charter. Then you need to decide which company or companies to use.

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Quote/Unquote

“When you get into the larger aircraft it becomes like a hotel, with dozens of staff supporting the plane based in a galley area down below. You have very comprehensive cooking facilities, and on larger aircraft we have looked at theatres, with spiral staircases and a Steinway grand piano. The limitations for what you can put inside a plane are pretty much the limits of physics, and even money cannot always overcome that. Even so, people are still always trying to push [the limits]. ”

-Howard Guy of Design Q, a UK-based consultancy