Business Jet Traveler’s Toolbox

Essential reading for anyone just getting started in bizav.

July 22, 2014
Which of the major bizav access models—charter, jet card or fractional ownership—best suits you? To begin to answer that question, determine which of the statements below apply to you. If more than half of the statements for an access option apply, it could be a good choice. Note, though, that not all statements carry equal weight; the hours you fly annually can trump other factors in determining whether a solution is appropriate.
July 20, 2014
Given the complexity of the deal and the money at stake, making a business aircraft change hands can seem almost like an act of magic. And as in Disney’s The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, acts of this sort are best left to professionals—specifically, aircraft brokers and their teams.
July 7, 2014
A flight attendant welcomes VistaJet client Frank McCourt, chairman and CEO of McCourt Global, aboard a Bombardier Global 6000 (Photo: Mark Wagner)
Given the amount of money involved, picking the right way to employ business aviation is one of the most critical financial decisions you can face. Unless you’re buying a whole aircraft, the first choice you have to make is what access model would best suit your needs, be it a fractional share, a jet card or traditional charter. Then you need to decide which company or companies to use.
July 6, 2014
When we interviewed entrepreneur Mark Cuban back in 2010, he explained how he purchased a Gulfstream GV online. First, he looked at info about the jet on the manufacturer’s website and sent an e-mail to set up a demo flight for his pilot, who reported back that he loved the airplane.
July 2, 2014
In the 1960s, McDonnell Douglas designed an unusual small jet, the four-engine Model 119. Though it received a provisional type certification, it never went into production.
Some people tried to convince Charles Lindbergh that he shouldn’t attempt his 1927 New York-to-Paris flight in an airplane with only one engine. His response was that two engines would double his odds of having an engine failure. In the graveyard humor of pilots, the saying goes, “The second engine will take you directly to the scene of the accident.” So Lucky Lindy chose a single Wright J5 Whirlwind to power the Spirit of St. Louis, and the rest is history.
June 29, 2014
The Cessna Caravan is now being marketed under the Textron Aviation umbrella, which includes Cessna and Beechcraft products.
In 1924, Clyde Cessna and Walter Beech started the Travel Air Manufacturing Company in Wichita, Kansas. Within four years it was the largest maker of commercial airplanes in the U.S. Cessna left to start his own company in 1927 and Beech did likewise in 1932, forming what we now know as Beechcraft.
June 22, 2014
If two identical airplanes are priced the same and one of them has a damage history and the other doesn't, which one would you buy? (Illustration: John Lewis)
What’s the worst thing that can happen to your business jet? You might think the answer is an accident resulting in total loss, but it’s not. If a hangar roof collapses and destroys your aircraft, your insurance should enable you to replace it. On the other hand, if the airplane is only damaged in the incident, the insurer may opt to repair it, leaving you with a jet that operates just fine but has (gasp) damage history.
June 6, 2014
Ostrich Pillow
No matter what the climate is at my destination, I always pack a large scarf. This accessory, which can easily fit in any purse or backpack, has at least a dozen uses. I can fold it to create a small pillow behind my back for lumbar support or a neck pillow for sleeping. The long length makes it great as a blanket or a shawl. In Istanbul, I used a scarf as a head covering, to drape over my shoulders and to wrap around my waist to cover my knees when entering mosques.
May 16, 2014
Click to enlarge image
When you’re evaluating the state of the used-aircraft market, you need to look at more than the percentage of the worldwide fleet that’s currently for sale. You have to investigate availability in a variety of geographical areas and model-year ranges.
April 20, 2014
Because the science of flight hasn’t changed, designers must still balance the desire for cabin enhancements with the need to minimize weight. Every ounce they save through creative use of technology adds range and performance to the airplane, helping passengers fly higher, faster and farther.

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Quote/Unquote

“Let me be straight with you. What I'd rather have is an airplane. We just had a third kid. I don't like flying commercial. I like to take my family to Hawaii. When I go east, I'd like to have pilots I know. ”