Another 'Boutique' Airline Goes Under

Business Jet Traveler » August 2008
Friday, August 1, 2008 - 5:00am

Britain's all-business-class carrier Silverjet ceased operations in May, becoming the third such airline to collapse within six months. MAXjet launched service in November 2005 and ceased operations in December 2007. Eos, which began service a month before MAXjet, lased just four months longer, filing for bankruptcy in April 2008. Silverjet had counted on a $5 million loan from Abu Dhabi-based investors that failed to materialize. The loss of Silverjet leaves French operator L'Avion, with Paris-New York service, as the sole remaining standalone, all-business-class operator.

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““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack