Business Aviation Caterers 2011

Buyers' Guide » 2011
Friday, July 1, 2011 - 5:00am

For the most dedicated business aviation caterers, there is no greater compliment than the smile that follows a bite of praline pecan French toast or maple duck breast with wild rice and blackberry juice. And among those who fly privately, there exists no shortage of folks who ­appreciate a fine meal, perfectly prepared and served.

The hundreds of kitchens that specialize in catering for private and corporate aviation produce many such meals. Here's a list of those caterers. So kick back, find the ones that cover your turf and get ready to enjoy. There's something for everyone.

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Name withheld by request
on January 24, 2012 - 2:17pm

"Business Aviation Caterers–Bon Appetit at 41,000 Feet" [Buyers' Guide 2011] offers a wonderful reference list of caterers. What it does not specify is which caterers prepared the food in your photographs. I would like to know their names. Why? Because in the nine years I have been a business aviation flight attendant, I have encountered only three caterers who have provided me with a fighting chance of presenting food to my passengers in the beautiful manner portrayed in your photographs: Deluxe Catering in London; and Tastefully Yours in Atlanta; and one in Lugano, Switzerland, whose name I don't recall. If there is a fourth caterer [that's as good], I would love the chance to use them. Your article suggests a perfect galley where nothing is overcooked and fresh basil sways in the slight breeze of recycled air. The truth is, often times to reach this nirvana the flight attendant has to go to hell and back. The catering is delivered to the wrong airport. Or the chicken breast is an overcooked hockey puck. Or the caterer's packaging was so bad, the petit fours now have a lobster bisque glaze. Or the catering arrived an hour late. Or the lunch looks like muck because the only "FBO-certified" caterer (i.e. the one providing kickbacks) makes muck for food. I appreciate the caterers who make flight attendants look like culinary queens but they are few and far between.

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