Bizav Basics » Charter/Cards/Frax

January 3, 2016
Until about 2013, “our pricing was below  cost, and that wasn’t sustainable in the long run,” says XOJet CEO Bradley Stewart.
In early 2009 XOJet upended the charter industry when it introduced all-inclusive one-way transcontinental U.S. rates of $19,000 aboard its owned and operated fleet of new Cessna Citation Xs (later joined by Bombardier Challenger 300s). Not bad for a company whose majority investor, Lehman Brothers, had gone bankrupt just months before
July 26, 2015
A charter or fractional provider's insurance can cause problems for customers. (Illustration: John Lewis)
If you’re a charter customer or fractional owner, your net worth may well exceed that of your flight provider. That would make you the deep pocket with the most to lose in an accident, yet you have no role in selecting the provider’s insurer or drafting its coverage terms. So how can you protect yourself? By performing the most dreaded task in all of aviation—reading the insurance policy—and by keeping these tips in mind:
July 19, 2015
Travelers who want to fly privately but can’t or don’t want to opt for full aircraft ownership have typically enjoyed three options: charter, jet cards and fractional shares. Choosing among them can be challenging, and now you have other alternatives to ponder as well, including lease arrangements, membership clubs and purchase-support programs. Let’s look at the pros and cons of each of these options.
February 11, 2015
Owner-approval issues can destroy a aircraft broker-client relationship. (Photo: Fotolia)
The owner-approval process can nix your charter booking—even at the last minute.
July 22, 2014
Which of the major bizav access models—charter, jet card or fractional ownership—best suits you? To begin to answer that question, determine which of the statements below apply to you. If more than half of the statements for an access option apply, it could be a good choice. Note, though, that not all statements carry equal weight; the hours you fly annually can trump other factors in determining whether a solution is appropriate.
July 7, 2014
A flight attendant welcomes VistaJet client Frank McCourt, chairman and CEO of McCourt Global, aboard a Bombardier Global 6000 (Photo: Mark Wagner)
Given the amount of money involved, picking the right way to employ business aviation is one of the most critical financial decisions you can face. Unless you’re buying a whole aircraft, the first choice you have to make is what access model would best suit your needs, be it a fractional share, a jet card or traditional charter. Then you need to decide which company or companies to use.
March 4, 2014
Two NetJets pilots walking out to their airplane.
Hindsight is 20/20—and in the fractional-share business, foresight may at best be about 20/1,000. In a market like today’s and with a rapidly evolving product like fractional, even the most seasoned insiders seem to lack a clear sense of what’s next. 
March 4, 2014
Customers exiting a limousine and immediately boarding their private business jet.
Last Fall, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) unveiled proposed rules for enhancing protection for air charter customers. Since then, several influential charter brokers have gone on record as saying the proposals don’t go far enough—even though brokers are the primary targets of those rules.
November 21, 2013
Illustration: John T. Lewis
Renewed consumer interest in jet cards has led to a wide assortment of new offerings.
September 18, 2013
One company offers an “all you can fly” membership for a flat monthly  fee of $1,650.
This increasingly available option can save you lots of money. Here’s what you need to consider.

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“It is relatively easy to be thankful for the most important and obvious parts of life…but truly happy people find ways to give thanks for the little, insignificant trifles…the smell of fall in the air, the fragment of a song that reminds you of when you were a kid. ”

-Social scientist and musician Arthur C. Brooks