Flying » Fractional Jet Ownership

August 1, 2010
Leasing might make sense if you can't take advantage of the tax-depreciation
You've analyzed numerous variables, including where, when and how often you fly. You've determined that a fractional share makes sense for you and figured out which aircraft model best suits your needs. You've even picked a fractional provider. Time to call the company, sign the paperwork and break out the margaritas?
June 1, 2010
Kenn Ricci, who founded Flight Options and left the company in 2003, returned
When industry observers speculate about the future of the four biggest fractional-jet-share providers, the company that often prompts the most discussion is Flight Options. That's because it has arguably undergone more change than its competitors while also lacking the protection afforded by being under a large corporate umbrella.
February 1, 2010
If you want to fly on designated “peak travel days,” you have to give your pr
A chief selling point of fractional flying is its simplicity. Unlike charter customers, you don't have to bother with shopping for a flight; and unlike full owners, you don't have to worry about maintenance, storage and hiring crews. The fractional provider takes care of all that.
December 1, 2009
AMERICA'S ECONOMIC DOWNTURN has dealt a crippling blow to the fractional-share industry. Rapidly declining used-aircraft prices and fewer flying hours over the past year have forced fractional operators to defer aircraft deliveries, cut staff and explore new ways to keep flying.
December 1, 2009
IS this A GOOD TIME to buy a fractional share? Or to sell the one you own? The answer, depending on your situation, could be yes to either question.
October 1, 2009
Richard Santulli wrote the rules on fractional ownership, and in the process
Richard T. Santulli, who resigned in August after nearly a quarter century as chairman of NetJets, had never been in an airplane-had in fact never been outside the New York/New Jersey/Connecticut metropolitan area- until he turned 21 and spent his honeymoon in Puerto Rico.
September 1, 2009
Providing aircraft at locations all over the U.S. on short notice is no small
Suze Orman didn't pause before answering when I asked whether she'd ever considered replacing her charter flights with a fractional jet share. "I think they're rip-offs," said the personal-finance guru, in an interview that appeared in our April/May 2009 issue.
February 1, 2009
When your aircraft is in the air, even if you’re not on it, you have exposure
As the economy has suffered historic setbacks, an old four-letter word has come to the fore in our business vernacular: risk. Just as you seek to better understand the risk of your portfolio investments, you should consider the risk that goes with your fractional jet ownership.
December 1, 2008
Don’t let fractional hours go unused; donate them to nonprofits that will use
For those facing life-threatening diseases, war-related injuries or other equally devastating hardships, the holidays can be an especially difficult time. Here's one way you can lend a hand: Donate unused fractional flight hours to a charity that will use them on behalf of the needy.
December 1, 2008
Planning a holiday ski trip? Your fractional provider may need more advance n
One of the joys of the holiday season is getting together with friends and family from around the country-particularly when you can avoid the hassles of commercial air travel and fly privately. This is the time of year when many of our fractional-share clients get the most out of their private jet ownership.

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Quote/Unquote

“"Many years ago, our company founder, Al Conklin, sold a new twin-engine business aircraft to a very successful entrepreneur. He had established a bit of a rapport with the individual and, after the sale, asked him straight out, 'How can you justify the cost of this airplane?' His reply? 'What is the cost of a divorce?'"–David Wyndham, president, Conklin & de Decker”

-David Wyndham