Flying » Fractional Jet Ownership

August 1, 2007
The fractional aircraft business is fascinating, in part because it is founded upon several myths, partial-truths and artificial constructs that are both pleasing for owners and profitable for providers. In many ways, fractional flying is more akin to using an executive airline than to owning a whole aircraft.
June 1, 2007
Fractional owners opt out of their contracts early for many reasons. You may have sold an out-of-town business and so charter or a jet card may better serve your reduced needs. Maybe you're flying  more than you expected and it makes sense for you to purchase a whole aircraft.
April 1, 2007
“We found that customers want greater simplicity in contract terms and more t
While the major fractional providers are still selling plenty of business-jet shares, recent reports indicate that they're also repurchasing existing shares at a rapid rate. As a result, net growth (sales minus repurchases) is at the lowest level in years.
February 1, 2007
Timmy (not his real name) is a four-year-old cancer patient. He cannot fly commercially due to his condition. But he must travel several times a year for treatment between his California home and Duke University Hospital in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.
December 1, 2006
Is fractional ownership right for you? Or would a jet-card program, a block-charter card program, on-demand charter or maybe even whole-aircraft ownership better suit your needs?

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Quote/Unquote

““When I made the film The Invention of Lying, they gave me a private jet for getting back and forth between New York and London. I thought, ‘I will never use it’ but I ended up using it every weekend. You turn up, right, and the airport is completely empty. I mean, there’s just someone at the desk and then the pilot, who says, ‘Are you ready to go?’ and you say, ‘Don’t you want to see my passport?’ and he goes, ‘Oh yeah, I suppose I’d better.’” ”

-—actor and comedian Ricky Gervais