Flying » Safety Matters

February 10, 2014
A wing with extensive icing.
Today's jets can handle most weather, but pilots of smaller aircraft sometimes need to sidestep trouble.
February 25, 2013
Preparing to ditch
It was his third try, and the first two hadn’t gone well. The man was seated in a bus-like facsimile of an airplane cabin suspended above what looked like an Olympic-size swimming pool. At the command of the leader of the exercise, the big blue “fuselage” plunged into the water and slowly turned upside-down.
April 13, 2011
Major industry groups are expressing their displeasure with key sections of the notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) governing helicopter EMS operations.
February 1, 2011
When an emergency happens, crews who have trained with full-motion simulators
Business aviation pilots must be ready for everything from bad weather to air-traffic-control problems to the failure of onboard computers. But training in an airplane to handle such situations can be both expensive and dangerous-hence the need for flight simulators. 
October 1, 2010
ALL TRANSPORTATION METHODS INVOLVE some risk, but corporate/executive business jets enjoy a stellar safety record, with only one fatal accident since 2007. That's according to statistics on U.S.-registered aircraft from Robert E. Breiling Associates, an aviation-safety research firm.
August 1, 2010
If you’re unsure, ask flight attendants about the safety training they’ve rec
How would you respond to an in-flight emergency? If your answer involves seeking help from flight attendants, that's not surprising. Passengers typically consider them to be the cabin safety go-to people.
December 1, 2009
Since the Wright brothers' first flight, major improvements in safety have resulted primarily from technological advances. The reduction in accidents over time has paralleled improved airplane and wing design and engine-propulsion technology, the introduction of traffic collision avoidance systems, terrain warning indicators and other innovative equipment.
April 1, 2009
In aviation's early years, accidents occurred much more frequently than they
To appreciate how safe air travel has become, it's helpful to realize how risky it once was and to understand how rules and regulations have evolved to address that problem.
February 1, 2009
The AAIR system includes a seatbelt airbag; an electronics module about the s
"It has never made sense to me that people who wouldn't consider driving in a car without airbags will get in an aircraft that doesn't have them," said Bill Hagan, president of Phoenix-based AmSafe Aviation. According to Hagan, airbags on airplanes can significantly increase passenger safety in accidents that occur during taxiing, takeoff and landing.
December 1, 2008
Often the crew is busiest when things appear to be the quietest.
Tempted to stroll up to the cockpit for a chat with the pilots and the view from the front office? Depending on what's going on up there, that may not be such a great idea. While pilots love to talk about what they love, passenger access to the cockpit comes with some restrictions for safety reasons.

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Quote/Unquote

“"Many years ago, our company founder, Al Conklin, sold a new twin-engine business aircraft to a very successful entrepreneur. He had established a bit of a rapport with the individual and, after the sale, asked him straight out, 'How can you justify the cost of this airplane?' His reply? 'What is the cost of a divorce?'"–David Wyndham, president, Conklin & de Decker”

-David Wyndham