Money » Taxes, Laws & Finance

December 6, 2015
Business jet owners have been clever in trying to dream up ways around FAA compensation strictures.
Understand FAA rules before accepting payment for a business jet flight. Compensation for flights is one of the most important concepts to consider when you’re structuring the ownership and operation of a business jet. For the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, the payment of compensation for air transportation usually makes a flight “commercial,” which requires that it be conducted under a commercial certificate.
November 24, 2015
“Annual depreciation going forward is probably not the  3 and 4 percent people saw for years, but more like 7 percent,” says one aircraft broker.
A global pullback accelerates declines in preowned-aircraft values. After several years of mixed signals and uncertainty, the preowned-aircraft market found its direction, if not its footing, in 2015.
October 24, 2015
Illustration by John T. Lewis
It’s no secret that the FAA and IRS approaches to business aviation differ in important ways. This cleavage is especially evident in their respective treatment of related or affiliated groups of companies.
September 7, 2015
(illustration: John Lewis)
Business aviation is regulated and watched by an alphabet soup of government agencies—FAA, IRS, DOT, SEC, state authorities and others—that don’t see eye-to-eye on key issues. A January 2015 federal District Court decision illuminates an excellent example: the disagreement between the IRS and FAA over who is providing transportation to whom.
July 5, 2015
Buyers who face long waits for a new airplane may consider leasing on a short-term basis. (Illustration: John Lewis)
An aircraft buyer waiting for delivery of his new Gulfstream G650 once complained that the manufacturer “wasn’t promoting instant gratification.” Who could blame him? The scheduled delivery was eight years away. With a wait like that if you don’t have another aircraft that you don’t mind flying for the better part of a decade, you might as well buy one to tide you over.
April 20, 2015
Illustration of pile of paperwork and business jet engine
Governmental agencies demand that aircraft owners maintain voluminous, detailed records. Specialized software can help.
February 24, 2015
Interest rates remain shockingly low today, so you can still lock in a highly attractive fixed rate. (Illustration: Fotolia)
Financing an aircraft means wading through fine print.
January 20, 2015
Even fractional shareowners can find themselves acting as indirect air carriers. (Illustration: John T. Lewis)
Some charter brokers have become overly creative in the methods they use to stimulate business, running afoul of Department of Transportation requirements in the process.
September 26, 2014
Time periods for leaving the state vary greatly. Kansas allows 10 days; Colorado gives you 120. The event that starts the clock varies greatly as well. (Illustration: John T. Lewis)
Sales taxes offer an easy way for states to raise revenue, and business jets are a favorite target.
September 1, 2014
One of the most pervasive myths about the taxation of business jets in the U.S. is that the owner isn’t entitled to any deductions unless more than 50 percent of the aircraft’s usage is in a trade or business. I hear this regularly from people who are contemplating a jet acquisition but worry that they won’t be able to take any tax deductions for it because less than half the usage will be business-related. Like many myths, this one contains a nugget of truth, as I’ll explain presently. But it’s incorrect to assume you can’t write off anything if your business use doesn’t exceed 50 percent.

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