Flying » Travelers' Aid

June 1, 2007
While few general aviation flights currently land or take off at Washington N
It took four years after the 9/11 attacks for the Department of Homeland Security to reopen Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport to general aviation traffic. These days, though, flying a business jet into the heart of the nation's capital is easier than you might think.
June 1, 2007
A key advantage of owning an airplane is that it becomes an extension of your home. You can fill the cabin with all sorts of creature comforts, such as your daughter's favorite teddy bear or your son's video games. The cabin might also be host to one or more actual creatures, such as the prize Papillon dog your wife carries around in her large pink purse.
April 1, 2007
Those business negotiations have taken an unexpected twist and you need to be in some far-off country as soon as possible. Arranging a flight? No problem. Packing? Piece of cake. Renewing your passport or getting a visa from a foreign government in a hurry? Here you might need help. This is where the services of a passport expediter can be invaluable.
April 1, 2007
The bar at the elegant Columbia Tower Club, which occupies the top two floors
Savvy business jet travelers well know and appreciate the speed, security, convenience and time-saving benefits of private air travel. But how can you prolong the experience after you arrive at your destination? Where can you arrange a discreet meeting with the chairman of the company you've been wooing as an investment partner?

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Quote/Unquote

““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack