Business Jet Traveler » August 2010

August 1, 2010
“in five years we will be back to a normal market that is better than previou
After bottoming out last year, business aviation appears ready to start growing again as the economic climate improves. The next five years should be interesting, and BJT asked industry experts to comment on what the field will look like by 2015. For the most part, they painted an appealing portrait. Here are some predictions:  1. The industry will be healthier. 
McG
August 1, 2010
When he introduces himself in a hangar at TWC Aviation in Van Nuys, Calif., film and television director and producer McG is so friendly and engaging that you can't help wishing he were a neighbor who might come over for the occasional beer or Monday Night Football get-together. 
August 1, 2010
A fully loaded GIV weighs 73,000 pounds, and 29,000 of that is fuel.
Applying the language of golf, the Gulfstream IV is a solid par performer. It's a no-drama player that hits straight down the middle, avoids the hazards and posts consistent scores.  
August 1, 2010
Leasing might make sense if you can't take advantage of the tax-depreciation
You've analyzed numerous variables, including where, when and how often you fly. You've determined that a fractional share makes sense for you and figured out which aircraft model best suits your needs. You've even picked a fractional provider. Time to call the company, sign the paperwork and break out the margaritas?
August 1, 2010
Wall Streeters and other experts have been making a variety of persuasive but conflicting predictions about where the economy is headed. Will a recovery be shaped like a V? Or a U? Or perhaps a W? One expert even suggested an L-shaped condition, in which a nosedive would be followed by an indefinite period where we skid sideways along the bottom.
August 1, 2010
A handful of operators own their fleets and can set whatever prices they want
Say for a moment that you own an aircraft rather than simply fly on those you charter. Given the direct operating costs and all the other expenses of ownership, how much would you charge a stranger to use your airplane?
August 1, 2010
Opportunities to mitigate IRS or SEC difficulties by paying for non-business
One of the biggest challenges posed by FAA regulations is how to pay for a flight on a non-commercial aircraft.

Pages

 

Quote/Unquote

“You want to make sure with a race in which you'll be flying home with other drivers that you don't crash into them. It's happened before, and it can make for a little bit of a tense situation.”