Business Jet Traveler » October 2008

October 1, 2008
"What a different scene we found at the island! It is sparsely populated and
"All of Croatia is beautiful," Slobodan Vrdoljak corrected me jovially. He is the man to contact for people flying by private jet to Zadar, on the country's Dalmatian coast. (See "Zadar Airport," on page 38.) Having only recently arrived here, we were lounging with him in the airport coffee shop.
October 1, 2008
A demonstration flight can help you determine whether the cabin size and conf
You probably wouldn't dream of buying a car without test-driving it. Yet people sometimes purchase airplanes they have never flown in-or even seen. Some of these buyers rely on a trusted business associate or flight crewmember to look at the aircraft for them, but this is a risky idea. If you're purchasing the airplane and will be riding in it, you'd be well advised to check it out yourself.
October 1, 2008
Gordon McCall's Motorworks Revival, which takes place annually at the Monterey [Calif.] Jet Center and serves as the kick-off for the Concours d'Elegance, lives up to its billing as "a very cool party...with classic cars and airplanes scattered over the acreage like a rich giant's toy box." So when our company received word from McCall that he had a static-display spot available for us at this
October 1, 2008
A little after 10 p.m. one night last March, I was hosing down my waders outside the drying room at Terra del Fuego's elegant Maria Behety Lodge when Brian Yamamoto came rolling in. Yamamoto, a dentist from Fairbanks, carried his 15-foot Snowbee spey rod and sported a smile as wide as the Argentine pampas.
October 1, 2008
Loose lithium batteries require careful handling. They’ve been blamed for an
While no one will stop you from stowing batteries on your own aircraft, the U.S. Department of Transportation has banned all loose batteries from checked baggage on airline and charter flights for reasons that seem just as applicable to privately owned jets.
October 1, 2008
Over time, cost certainty for owners has been substantially eliminated from t
Legendary golfer Ben Hogan once said that the secret to the game is "in the dirt." By that he meant the nitty gritty of digging into the details. This column usually focuses on the "dirt"-the details of fractional investments.
October 1, 2008
Airplanes come apart in midair for a variety of reasons. An errant pilot loses control or flies a model past its design limit, or unrepaired cracks and corrosion cause structure to fail. Fortunately, rigorous pilot training and aircraft maintenance standards make such events few and far between. Even rarer is the case when a design flaw brings down a relatively new airplane.
October 1, 2008
The Range Rover can tackle a broad menu of tasks, from swift highway hauling
To a car driver deprived of his view of the road ahead, an SUV hogging the left lane is hardly a welcome sight. The longer it sits there, the more deeply the car driver ponders its often wasteful bulk, its appetite for gasoline and how brilliant it would be to confine these bloated conveyances to their own clogged stream over there on the far right. Who could possibly love an SUV?
October 1, 2008
DayJet offers a sliding price scale based on passengers' flexibility about de
[Editor's note: On September 19, 2008, DayJet Services, LLC, discontinued its jet services and canceled all future flights, the result, the company said, of its "inability to arrange critical financing in the midst of the current global financial crisis." DayJet also said it was unable to honor customer reservations or issue refunds.]
October 1, 2008
Orlando is becoming a major hub and resource center for corporate aviation, and for good reason: its metropolitan area boasts an unusually high number of corporate aircraft maintenance and crew training facilities. It also has perhaps the densest concentration of world-class fixed-base operators (FBOs) in the U.S.

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Quote/Unquote

““CEOs go to their vacation homes just after companies report favorable news, and CEOs return to headquarters right before subsequent news is released. More good news is released when CEOs are back at work, and CEOs appear not to leave headquarters at all if a firm has adverse news to disclose. When CEOs are away from the office, stock prices behave quietly with sharply lower volatility. Volatility increases immediately when CEOs return to work.” —David Yermack, a New York University finance professor, whose recently released study shows a correlation between when CEOs take their private jets on vacation and movements in their companies’ stock price ”

-David Yermack