Business Jet Traveler

April 1, 2007
With enough power, you can make a barn door fly.
Ask a pilot what keeps an airplane in the sky and he'll most likely talk about the forces of lift, thrust, gravity and drag; power-to-weight ratios; and possibly "airfoils"-the word used to describe the wings' shape. Or maybe he'll answer simply, "Your credit card." Either way, it's not much comfort when you're eight miles above terra firma with no visible means of support.
April 1, 2007
“I’m very engaged, but I try to avoid bungee jumping into other managers’ bus
If 10 years ago you had peeked into the cockpit of almost any business aircraft or airliner in the world, you would have seen a large, boxy flight bag holding several thick leather binders with the words "Jeppesen Airway Manual" embossed on the cover.
April 1, 2007
Edwards’ and May’s 1971 Cessna Citation 500 boasts terrain-warning and global
While the average car winds up on the junk heap after about 13 years, the typical business jet has a much longer lifespan. In fact, at least a few are still flying after more than 40 years (see box below). One vintage jet we found is owned by Rick Edwards and Louis May of Little Rock, Ark., who are business partners and have been friends since childhood.
April 1, 2007
"I haven’t seen a bowling alley in an ACJ yet, but I’m sure the day is coming
Airbus followed Boeing into the prepackaged "bizliner" market in 1997. That's when it announced the Airbus Corporate Jet (ACJ), a then $35 million executive version of its A319 airliner. At first, ACJ sales were sluggish, while Boeing initially did well with its 737 airliner variant. Today, Boeing has sold more than 100 of its Boeing Business Jets (BBJs).
March 1, 2007
A 30-degree navigational error was immediately corrected after a passenger tu
Is it safe to use cellphones and other personal electronics on airplanes? It depends on whom you ask, but researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say that the cacophony of electronic "noise" emitted by portable devices brought onboard by passengers indeed can cause dangerous interference with navigation sensors in the cockpit.
February 1, 2007
Do you have a favorite in-flight meal or caterer you’d like to see featured h
The Dish: Organic breakfast quiche. Pan-seared shitake mushrooms combined with tender baby spinach, organic whole milk and farm-fresh eggs. Served with heirloom melons and berries. The Caterer: Chefs With Altitude, El Segundo and Irvine, Calif., (877)-CWA-4141, www.chefswithaltitude.com.
February 1, 2007
"I spent a lot of time talking to venture capitalists. It was one of the most
Frank Robinson readily admits he's not your typical CEO. "When I worked for the big aerospace companies, I was always a bit of a maverick," he explained to me in his relatively small, Spartan office just off the production floor of Robinson Helicopter Co. in Torrance, Calif. "I don't think I could have gotten anywhere if I had stayed with any of them.
February 1, 2007
Opposition to user fees for general aviation aircraft remains on the front burner this year for the industry's advocacy groups.
February 1, 2007
Art aficionados have a new way to enjoy their hobby in an exclusive environment. Bonita Springs, Fla.-based SeaFair is creating a gallery on a luxury yacht for the exhibition of American and international art. The ship will bring high-end art dealers and jewelers to cities along the East Coast, eliminating the need for enthusiasts to travel long distances to visit important galleries.
February 1, 2007
The early days were a little less than noble for Wyvern, the Palmyra, N.J.-based charter auditing firm. The company took its name from a mythical, winged dragon that was said to be so large it preyed upon elephants.

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Quote/Unquote

““Last year, complaints about airlines increased 22%.  There were probably more complaints, but the airlines lost them.” ”

-Television host and comedian Conan O'Brien