Flying

October 1, 2008
Loose lithium batteries require careful handling. They’ve been blamed for an
While no one will stop you from stowing batteries on your own aircraft, the U.S. Department of Transportation has banned all loose batteries from checked baggage on airline and charter flights for reasons that seem just as applicable to privately owned jets.
October 1, 2008
Airplanes come apart in midair for a variety of reasons. An errant pilot loses control or flies a model past its design limit, or unrepaired cracks and corrosion cause structure to fail. Fortunately, rigorous pilot training and aircraft maintenance standards make such events few and far between. Even rarer is the case when a design flaw brings down a relatively new airplane.
October 1, 2008
DayJet offers a sliding price scale based on passengers' flexibility about de
[Editor's note: On September 19, 2008, DayJet Services, LLC, discontinued its jet services and canceled all future flights, the result, the company said, of its "inability to arrange critical financing in the midst of the current global financial crisis." DayJet also said it was unable to honor customer reservations or issue refunds.]
October 1, 2008
When it comes to that little cabin behind the cabin, better known as the aircraft lavatory, the average passenger cares far more about whether it works than how it works.
October 1, 2008
Taking care of an airplane is a big job, which is why many owners turn it over to management companies. As part of the arrangement, these companies often charter out the aircraft. Most of their charter customers are legitimate business travelers, but the government is now warning business jet charter operators about a different type of clientele-drug smugglers.
October 1, 2008
Over time, cost certainty for owners has been substantially eliminated from t
Legendary golfer Ben Hogan once said that the secret to the game is "in the dirt." By that he meant the nitty gritty of digging into the details. This column usually focuses on the "dirt"-the details of fractional investments.
October 1, 2008
Paris’ Grand Palais hosted the first-ever airshow in 1908. An entirely indoor
Business Jet Traveler published its inaugural issue in October 2003-just two months before the 100th anniversary of Orville and Wilber Wright's first powered flight.
August 4, 2008
When it comes to pure climbing power, the Learjet 60 is hard to beat. This airplane doesn't just take off-it blasts off.
August 1, 2008
Just because your aircraft can fly nonstop doesn’t mean that you can.
Before booking my first charter flight in 2001, I visited industry Web sites, drove to the airport to sit in some airplanes, got advice from a reputable broker and read through a pile of operators' brochures and guides. I felt as well prepared as any new customer could be.
August 1, 2008
Flying passengers with special needs is possible—it just requires a little pl
Maybe you'd like to fly a wheelchair-bound relative to a family function. Or perhaps a member of your management team has contracted a bad case of the flu during a business trip. Flights with passengers like these-or anyone with a significant health issue-necessitate special planning.

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Quote/Unquote

“"Many years ago, our company founder, Al Conklin, sold a new twin-engine business aircraft to a very successful entrepreneur. He had established a bit of a rapport with the individual and, after the sale, asked him straight out, 'How can you justify the cost of this airplane?' His reply? 'What is the cost of a divorce?'"–David Wyndham, president, Conklin & de Decker”

-David Wyndham