Time Off » Outdoor Adventures

February 1, 2008
The first morning out, he caught a brown trout. Almost 30 inches long. The st
A quarter mile from the Estancia del Zorro-the ranch of the fox-flows a stream my friend Brian O'Keefe calls the best spring creek he has ever fished. This is saying something. O'Keefe, who lives in the Oregon high desert, has made an enviable life of searching the world for great fishing.
December 1, 2007
European brown trout, introduced to the crystalline waters of New Zealand in 1868, have thrived in this country, which is roughly the size of California. Wild populations have created what many well-traveled fly fishers believe are the finest river trout fisheries in the world today. These trout are large. They are beautiful. They are also some of the most difficult to catch.
October 1, 2007
Three thousand kilometers from tidewater, a porpoise surfaces. Then a foot-long skinny slasher of a fish grabs the streamer fly you strip through water the color of Lapsong tea and shreds it. Sweat runs down your nose. The February sun blazes.
August 1, 2007
During the golden weeks of late September and early October, few places offer a greater fly-fishing spectacle than the short tidal rivers on the edge of the Bering Glacier, an ice field larger than Rhode Island. These rivers are packed with coho salmon-silvers, as Alaskans call them.
June 1, 2007
The author, Thomas R. Pero,  holds a six-pound trout.
You'll find brook trout in countless alder-lined beaver bogs and tumbling canopy-forest brooks along the spine of the Appalachians, throughout the New England backwoods and over to Michigan's sandy upper peninsula. All of them are delicate and tiny.
April 1, 2007
Stand in a trout stream holding a fly rod for as many hours and days as the patience of your partner back home and the indulgence of your boss, employees or stockholders will permit. Sooner or later, you'll catch a spotted porpoise of a fish so improbably outsized for the shallow confines of the freshwater creek where it swims that you won't believe it.
February 1, 2007
In the tall, dark, moss-draped, rainy forests of Oregon's coastal mountains-a mysterious evergreen world captured perfectly in the novels of Ken Kesey-emerald rivers rush headlong to the grey, wild North Pacific. Nehalem, Wilson, Trask, Necanicum, Nestucca-places whose names intoxicate anglers under the spell of a fish called steelhead.
December 1, 2006
Think you've caught some spirited fish before? Think again. Consider the Pacific sailfish. On a fly. Not a real fly, of course-or more precisely, a whimsy of fluff on a hook posing as a natural insect-but rather a 10-inch-long gob of chicken feathers dyed hot pink and lashed to a miniature harpoon.




“"How many leaders actively seek out and encourage views alien and at odds with their own? All too few...Who in your organization serves as your Challenger In Chief? Interrogating the choices you are considering making? Making you consider the uncontemplated, the unimaginable and that which contradicts or refutes your position? And also challenging you?"”

-Noreena Hertz, author of Eyes Wide Open: How To Make Smart Decisions in a Confusing World