Flying » Fractional Jet Ownership

October 1, 2008
Over time, cost certainty for owners has been substantially eliminated from t
Legendary golfer Ben Hogan once said that the secret to the game is "in the dirt." By that he meant the nitty gritty of digging into the details. This column usually focuses on the "dirt"-the details of fractional investments.
August 1, 2008
One company lacked a mid-size jet that fit the bill. Another wouldn’t fly to
To determine the best fractional investment, the first thing you have to do is consider your travel profile--including where you fly, how long your trips are, how many passengers you carry, how much luggage you take, what aircraft you prefer and, of course, how much you are willing to spend. Analyzing this information, you can often come up with a single, best solution.
June 1, 2008
As I noted in my February/March column, the salesperson for your fractional provider will do his best to convince you that everyone signs the same simple contract and that the terms are "just boilerplate." In fact, as I explained, those terms require careful consideration because they govern your rights and obligations with respect to what likely will be a multimillion-dollar investment--and th
June 1, 2008
Exploring the secondary fractional market before reselling your share could s
When the time comes to sell your timeshare in a luxury resort, you naturally consult the property's operator to see what kind of deal it can offer. Chances are, however, that you also keep your options open in case someone wants to buy your share directly, which would save you any fees the resort might charge for the transaction.
April 1, 2008
Ferry fees have always been part of fractional flying. Now, however, some fractional providers have made changes to their programs that substantially reduce-if not eliminate-the fees for their owners. As a result, these owners enjoy expanded ferry-fee-free travel horizons, and the other fractional providers' may find they need to respond in kind.
February 1, 2008
There are significant differences among the major fractional programs, said o
The fractional share market "has passed its period of rapid growth," according to a report prepared by consulting firm Velocity Group for XOJet, a company that sells flight time in hourly increments. Fractional shareholder growth averaged 2.2 percent per year from 2003 to 2006, but the fractional share fleet actually shrunk a bit, according to Velocity.
February 1, 2008
One provision generally prohibits you from assigning your share, significantl
Black's Law Dictionary defines "boilerplate" in part as "standard language in a legal document." In fractional contracts, plenty of provisions appear to be just that, and the response from your salesperson when asked about such provisions is likely to be, "Oh, don't worry. That's just boilerplate."
January 7, 2008
Fuel charges now substantially affect the cost of fractional flying
Fractional ownership became popular in the 1990s and now is a staple on the private air travel menu of options. With fractional, you purchase a partial interest in an aircraft that an aviation company operates. Along with other owners, you have the right to use any comparable aircraft in the company's fleet, on demand, for a predetermined number of hours each year.
December 1, 2007
Considering that the fractional-aircraft field was borne of a new business model and has been around for more than 20 years, it is perhaps surprising that the basic structure remains fundamentally unchanged: you purchase a share of an aircraft from the provider at a premium; you pay management fees, hourly rates and fuel surcharges; and at the end of your contract, you sell your share back to t
October 1, 2007
In the 1990s, a booming economy created fertile ground for fractional flying, a new form of private air travel that providers touted as having predictable costs and being much less expensive than full ownership.

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