Business Jet Traveler

September 13, 2015
New business jets have become more efficient and environment-friendly in recent years, weighing less, burning less fuel and doing so more cleanly. But what about your airplane’s nest? What can you do to make your hangar “go green”? Many of today’s corporate aircraft hangars seem like throwbacks to World War II. They’re metal sheets riveted onto steel frames spanning a concrete slab, with precious little insulation. Illumination comes from harsh, electricity-sucking metal halide, mercury or sodium vapor, or fluorescent lights, and giant gas space heaters hang from the rafters. Want cooling? Buy a couple of big ceiling fans or open the door. These structures often are leaky energy drains and can be unpleasant places to work.
September 13, 2015
People boarding a aircraft
If you saw the final episode of Mad Men in May you’ll recall where the characters stood as the 1970s began: most were basically in the same rut, in a rapidly changing world. But one of them, at least, wound up with a new job, a leg up on the future and access to a business jet. Prominently, there was lost soul Don Draper, gazing tragically out to sea from a spiritual retreat on the California coast, sourly intoning “om om” with doe-eyed hippies while, evidently, he dreamt up nothing more groovy than a Coca-Cola commercial. Back on the East Coast, there was Don’s whiny ex-wife Betty dying of lung cancer; and that rascal Roger winding up with the ill-tempered Marie, mother of the mercurial Megan, Don’s other ex-wife. Stan and Peggy, now a couple, were still creating ads at McCann-Erickson.
September 7, 2015
(illustration: John Lewis)
Business aviation is regulated and watched by an alphabet soup of government agencies—FAA, IRS, DOT, SEC, state authorities and others—that don’t see eye-to-eye on key issues. A January 2015 federal District Court decision illuminates an excellent example: the disagreement between the IRS and FAA over who is providing transportation to whom.
September 1, 2015
Hands sprinkling nuts on food
Charter operators, in concert with catering companies and select restaurants, are enhancing their food service to distinguish themselves in a competitive marketplace and meet customers’ growing expectations. “We see catering not as an additional cost someone will have to pay, but as another way we can encapsulate our brand and positively affect the customer experience,” says Ian Moore, chief commercial officer at VistaJet, an international charter service that operates Bombardier Challenger and Global jets. VistaJet recently announced that customers who sign up for at least 100 flight hours annually for three years will receive gourmet meals from leading restaurants at no extra charge.
September 1, 2015
Writer Gemma Price enjoys Myanmar.
BJT’s travel writers seem to barely unpack before they’re off again to another far-flung destination; and over the years, they’ve been just about everywhere. We wondered which places rank as the all-time favorites for such seasoned travelers—so we asked. Here’s what they told us.
August 31, 2015
Airforce One
The U.S. Air Force has tapped Boeing to supply a trio of 747-8 quad-engine jumbo jets to serve as the official presidential aircraft, aka Air Force One, at a cost of more than $1.6 billion.
August 31, 2015
It’s no wonder you don’t hear much negative talk about business aviation safety: there’s not much bad news to discuss. The safety record for private, charter and fractional business jets has long been by far the best of all of general aviation, which includes personal, training, sightseeing, utility and owner-flown turbine and non-turbine aircraft. Only the major airlines have a better long-term record. One reason is that they fly on regular schedules to the same destinations, so their pilots follow the same or similar routing, use the same airports and know what instructions to expect from air traffic controllers. Also, U.S. carriers operate under the most stringent federal aviation regulations. They must adhere to pilot duty-time limits and employ drug and alcohol testing, cockpit resource management, safety management systems and standard operations procedures.
August 30, 2015
Five and eight may be small numbers, but Airbus is betting they’ll represent a big difference for its new A350-900 XWB (extra wide body). The model is five inches wider and, claims the manufacturer, 8 percent more fuel-efficient than Boeing’s 787, with which it will compete in the long-haul, twinjet market. In 2018, Airbus expects to introduce a stretched version of the aircraft, the A350-1000, to go head-to-head with Boeing’s even larger 777 twinjet.
August 30, 2015
Hands holding piggy bank
How should you talk to your kids about money? All parents face the question of how to raise financially literate and responsible children, but affluent families encounter special challenges. The key is starting early—perhaps even as soon as when your child receives his first tooth-fairy dollars.
August 20, 2015
The latest products for your aircraft can mean faster Internet connections…and clean dinnerware.




““Last year, complaints about airlines increased 22%.  There were probably more complaints, but the airlines lost them.” ”

-Television host and comedian Conan O'Brien