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Understanding Business Jet Purchase Contracts

It’s easy to see why most business jets are sold on what’s known as an “as is, where is” basis. They can break down, require costly repairs, and be involved in incidents resulting in damage to the aircraft, passengers, and other people and property. If you’re selling your jet, you don’t expect to be responsible for issues like this if they happen after closing; you expect to pass that responsibility to the buyer along with title to the aircraft. The first seller of an airplane—the manufacturer—has an advantage here.

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